Greenhouses for Homeowners and Gardeners

Publication Number: NRAES-137
Cost: $24.00
Length: 200 pages
Published: 2000
ISBN: 0-935817-51-4
Authors: John W. Bartok. Jr.
Features: 150+ line drawings, Sample calculations, Greenhouse plans
Price Reduced from $30!

Eight chapters cover selecting a greenhouse plan or kit, construction planning, framing materials, glazing, layouts, equipment, environmental control, window greenhouses, growth chambers, and garden structures. Useful to gardeners, homeowners, educators, small farmers, retirement homes, schools, and other institutions.

Note: A brief "new book announcement" is also available; scroll down after the news release on this page.

Want to Build a Home Greenhouse? This Book Describes Your Options

For Immediate Release
June 2005

Whether it means tending to a collection of exotic houseplants or cultivating a year-round crop of vegetables, greenhouse gardening appeals to many people for many different reasons. A greenhouse can help garden enthusiasts get through the cold part of the year; it fills a void during winter, when weather prohibits gardening outdoors. Home greenhouses are ideal for introducing children to nature and showing them how seeds develop into flowering plants or nutritious vegetables. Retirees often adopt greenhouse gardening as a hobby to enjoy during their retirement years.

The award-winning Greenhouses for Homeowners and Gardeners ($30.00 plus S&H/sales tax, 200 pages, June 2000) will help readers select and design the most appropriate size and style of greenhouse to fit their needs, find the best place to locate a greenhouse, and decide whether to build a greenhouse themselves or hire a contractor to do it. This comprehensive, easy-to-read book covers every style and type of greenhouse -- from relatively inexpensive film-plastic-covered growing spaces to custom-designed, cozy sunspaces that extend the living space within the home. The book addresses a wide audience, including gardeners, homeowners, cooperative extension educators, and institutions (such as retirement homes, schools, and prison associations). Small farmers may also find the book useful.

The book contains eight chapters on the following topics: greenhouse basics, selecting a greenhouse, greenhouse planning, framing materials and glazing, greenhouse layouts and equipment, the greenhouse environment, window greenhouses and growth chambers, and garden structures. It will enable both aspiring and practicing greenhouse operators to make informed decisions about foundations, glazing and framing materials, space utilization, interior design, heating and cooling systems, supplemental lighting, watering and fertilizing systems, and other greenhouse design and construction issues. The garden structures chapter covers the design, construction, and use of cold frames, hotbeds, shade houses, rowcovers, and high tunnels.

Nearly 150 line drawings illustrate the 214-page book to help readers visualize the way greenhouses are built; evaluate alternative methods of construction; design interiors; select labor-saving equipment; and understand the skills involved in designing, building, and operating a greenhouse. Ten diverse do-it-yourself plans for home greenhouses and other garden structures are provided in an appendix. Each plan includes materials lists and construction diagrams and details. Three additional appendixes contain a greenhouse maintenance checklist, lists of greenhouse and equipment suppliers, and useful conversions. A glossary of terms that might be unfamiliar to readers and an index are included as well.

Greenhouses for Homeowners and Gardeners was written by John W. Bartok, Jr., Professor Emeritus in the Department of Natural Resources Management and Engineering at the University of Connecticut. He wrote the book to update similar publications that have become obsolete due to changes in materials and construction techniques. Bartok has over thirty years of experience working with hobbyists, commercial growers, institutions, and manufacturers. His book was published by the Natural Resource, Agriculture, and Engineering Service (NRAES).


# # #

New Book Announcement

Want to Build a Home Greenhouse? This Book Describes Your Options

For Immediate Release
June 2005

If you're considering building a home greenhouse, the award-winning Greenhouses for Homeowners and Gardeners will help you evaluate your options. This comprehensive, easy-to-read guide covers greenhouse basics, selecting a greenhouse, greenhouse planning, framing materials and glazing, greenhouse layouts and equipment, the greenhouse environment, window greenhouses and growth chambers, and garden structures. It will enable both aspiring and practicing greenhouse operators to make informed decisions about foundations, glazing and framing materials, space utilization, interior design, heating and cooling systems, supplemental lighting, and watering and fertilizing systems. Other design and construction issues cover cold frames, hotbeds, shade houses, rowcovers, and high tunnels. Nearly 150 illustrations and ten do-it-yourself plans enhance this practical book. Greenhouses for Homeowners and Gardeners was written by John W. Bartok, Jr., Professor Emeritus in the Department of Natural Resources Management and Engineering at the University of Connecticut, and was published in 2000 by NRAES, the Natural Resource, Agriculture, and Engineering Service.


Note: See also the more descriptive news release above.

Tables

Introduction

About This Book

Chapter 1 -- Greenhouse Basics: Getting Started

How Does a Greenhouse Work?
How Are Greenhouses Used?
Year-round Greenhouses
Season-extender Greenhouses
Conservatories
Sunspaces
Window Greenhouses
Indoor Light Gardens
How Much Does a Greenhouse Cost?
How Much Time Does a Greenhouse Demand?

Chapter 2 -- Selecting a Greenhouse: Types, Styles, and Sizes

Types of Greenhouses
Attached (Lean-to) Greenhouses
Freestanding Greenhouses
Pit Greenhouses
Solar Greenhouses
Greenhouse Styles
Selecting a Size
Sidebar: Greenhouse Aesthetics

Chapter 3 -- Greenhouse Planning: Permits, Building Options, Foundations, and Utilities

Permits
Zoning Permits
Building Permits
Custom Designs
Reasons for a Custom Design
Services Provided by Architects and Engineers
Accommodating the Physically and Mentally Challenged
Access
Layout
Benches
Environmental Control
Watering Devices and Tools
Hiring a Contractor to Build a Greenhouse
How to Find a Contractor
The Importance of a Contract
Building a Kit Greenhouse
The Instruction Manual
Skill Level Required to Build a Kit Greenhouse
Sidebar: Construction Tips for Kit Greenhouses
Tools Required to Build a Kit Greenhouse
Storage of Materials
Sidebar: Tools and Equipment for Building a Kit Greenhouse
Building a Greenhouse from Plans
Materials
Purchasing a Used Greenhouse
Inspection and Evaluation
What Is a Used Greenhouse Worth?
Disassembly and Reassembly
The Foundation
Types of Foundations
Foundation Layout
Upgrading a Greenhouse
Utilities
Electricity
Water Supply

Chapter 4 -- Framing Materials and Glazing

Framing Materials
Galvanized Steel
Aluminum
Wood
Sidebar: Tips for Building Wood Frames
Glazing
Light Requirements of Plants
Glazing Basics
Types of Glazing
Installation
Glass
Corrugated Fiberglass, Polycarbonate, and Polyethylene
Flat Fiberglass and Polycarbonate
Structured Sheets Polycarbonate and Acrylic
Film Plastic

Chapter 5 -- Greenhouse Layouts and Equipment for Efficiency

Using Space Inside the Greenhouse
The Layout
Racks and Shelves
Beds
Work Areas
Benches
Space Under Benches
Floors and Walkways
Labor-saving Equipment
Growing Media Preparation Equipment
Planting Aids
Materials Handling Equipment
Pesticide Application Equipment and Storage
Personal Protective Equipment
Monitoring Instruments
Watering Systems
Mist Systems
Overhead Watering Systems
Trickle Watering Systems
Capillary Mats
Hydroponics and Soilless Culture Systems
Fertilizing Systems
Selecting a Proportioner
Proportioner Installation and Use
Adjusting Proportions

Chapter 6 -- The Greenhouse Environment: Heating, Cooling, and Plant Lighting

Heating the Greenhouse
Sizing the Heater
Choosing a Fuel
Cost of Heating the Greenhouse
Heating Units
Energy Conservation
Interior Liners
Exterior Covers
Sealing Laps
Thermal Blankets
Permanent Insulation
Management Practices to Reduce Energy Usage
Cooling the Greenhouse
Heat Exclusion
Natural Ventilation Systems
Fan Systems
Evaporative Cooling
Sidebar: Winter Ventilation
Controlling Humidity
Measuring Humidity
Increasing Humidity
Decreasing Humidity
Air Circulation
Environmental Control
Thermostats
Controllers
Computers
Supplemental Lighting
Lighting Basics
Light Sources
Measuring Light
Cost of Supplemental Lighting

Chapter 7 -- Window Greenhouses and Growth Chambers

Window Greenhouses
Selection
Environmental Control
Installation
Operation
Germination and Growth Chambers
Germination Cabinet
Growth Chamber
Light-Support Frame
Cart
Rack System

Chapter 8 -- Garden Structures

Cold Frames and Hotbeds
Constructing the Frame
Locating the Frame
Making a Hotbed
Using a Cold Frame or Hotbed
Construction and Operating Costs
Plants to Grow in Cold Frames and Hotbeds
Shade Houses
Uses for Shade Houses
Shade House Construction
Rowcovers and High Tunnels
Rowcovers
High Tunnels

Appendix A -- Maintaining the Greenhouse: A Checklist

Frame
Glazing
Heating System
Cooling System
Water System
Lighting
General Cleanliness
Winter Maintenance

Appendix B -- Greenhouse and Equipment Suppliers

Greenhouse Manufacturers and General Suppliers
Greenhouse Replacement Part Suppliers
Suppliers of Specific Equipment

Appendix C -- Greenhouse Plans

8' x 12' Lean-to Greenhouse
8' x 16' Curved-eave, Lean-to Greenhouse
8' x 8' Freestanding Greenhouse
10' x 10' A-frame Greenhouse
12' x 15' Gothic Greenhouse
10' x 12' Slant-leg Greenhouse
14' x 21' Vertical-leg Greenhouse
10' x 16' Pit Greenhouse
10' x 12' High Tunnel
3' x 6' Cold Frame

Appendix D -- Useful Conversions

Glossary

References

Other Publications from NRAES

Index

About the Author

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