Organic Vegetable Production

Publication Number: NRAES-165
Cost: $20.00
Length: 162 pages
Published: 2004
ISBN: 0-935817-96-4
Features: 20 papers, 23 illustrations, Web site list
Price reduced from $28!

Includes information on managing soil quality, weeds, diseases, and insects (both pest and beneficial). Case studies describe farmer practices related to fertility management, compost, crop rotations, cover crops, mulching, and irrigation. Proceedings of a January 2003 conference.

Note: A brief "new book announcement" is also available; scroll down after the news release on this page.

Organic Vegetable Production Is Explored in New Workshop Proceedings

With increasing concerns about health and the environment, and with the quality and origin of the foods we eat, comes a growing demand for organically grown foods. Commercial vegetable producers growing organically and those contemplating organic vegetable production, as well as educators, researchers, and advisors, will find the book a valuable resource.

Organic Vegetable Production, NRAES-165 (162 pages; March 2004), is the proceedings of a three-day series of meetings held at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York in January 2003. The meetings brought together both university and farmer speakers -- all experts in their fields -- to share information on the management practices that have worked well for them.

The 162-page book is divided into three sections. Each section begins with a selection of papers by researchers and educators from Cornell University, University of Massachusetts, University of Vermont, and NOFA (Northeast Organic Farming Association) of New York. Concluding each section are transcripts of presentations by organic producers who participated in the program to share their experiences in specific aspects of organic vegetable production.

The first section includes seven papers covering soil and nutrient management. In addition to three farm profiles, papers cover soil life, interpreting soil test results and estimating nutrient availability, tillage practices, and the use of compost and cover crops. The second section includes six papers on weed management, including weed biology, cultivation tools and strategies, mulching, and a system combining the use of cover crops and tillage. The third section on insect and disease management includes seven papers, covering the impact of soil quality on disease and insect resistance, disease management strategies, the use of organic insecticides, and identifying and encouraging beneficial insects. A guide to relevant web sites and publications, along with contact information in each northeastern state, is also included.

Organic Vegetable Production was edited by Abby Seaman, Area Extension Educator, New York State Integrated Pest Management Program, Cornell Cooperative Extension, who was also coordinator for the workshop. Partial funding for the workshop was provided by the Northeast Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program, which is administered by the Cooperative State Research Education and Extension Service and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).


# # #

New Book Announcement

Organic Vegetable Production Is Explored in New Workshop Proceedings

For Immediate Release
April 2004

Organic Vegetable Production, NRAES-165 -- the proceedings of a three-day series of meetings held in January 2003 -- covers twenty presentations by both university and farmer speakers, all experts in their fields. Papers are divided into three sections by topic -- soil and nutrient management, weed management, and insect and disease management. Each section begins with a selection of papers by researchers and educators from Cornell University, University of Massachusetts, University of Vermont, and NOFA (Northeast Organic Farming Association) of New York. Concluding each section are transcripts of presentations by organic producers who participated in the program to share their experiences in specific aspects of organic vegetable production.

Note: See also the more descriptive news release above.

About the Speakers

Soil and Nutrient Management

Soil Life
Janice Thies
Department of Crop and Soil Sciences
Cornell University

Interpreting Soil Test Results and Estimating Nutrient Availability
John Howell
UMass Extension
University of Massachusetts

Tillage Practices for Maintaining Soil Quality
Harold van Es
Department of Crop and Soil Sciences
Cornell University

Compost and Cover Crops for Organic Vegetable Growers
Brian Caldwell
Northeast Organic Farming Association of New York

Soil and Nutrient Management Practices on Upingill Farm
Cliff Hatch
Upingill Farm
Gill, Massachusetts

Soil and Nutrient Management Practices on Roxbury Farm
Jean-Paul Courtens
Roxbury Farm
Kinderhook, New York

Fertility Management at Roxbury Farm
Jean-Paul Courtens
Roxbury Farm
Kinderhook, New York

Weed Management

Understanding Weed Biology
Charles L. Mohler
Crop and Soil Sciences
Cornell University

Weed Management on Organic Vegetable Farms
Vern Grubinger
University of Vermont Extension

How to Get 99% Weed Control without Chemicals
Brian Caldwell
Northeast Organic Farming Association of New York

Mulching for Weed Control and Organic Matter
Paul Arnold
Pleasant Valley Farm
Argyle, New York

Bio-Extensive Approach to Market Gardening
Anne and Eric Nordell
Beech Grove Farm
Beech Grove, Pennsylvania

A Few Long Furrows on Horsedrawn Tillage
Eric and Anne Nordell
Beech Grove Farm
Beech Grove, Pennsylvania

Insect and Disease Management

Impacts of Soil Quality on Disease and Insect Resistance in Plants
Anusuya Rangarajan
Dept. of Horticulture
Cornell University

Disease Management Strategies: Cultural Practices
Helene R. Dillard
Department of Plant Pathology
New York State Agricultural Experiment Station; Geneva, New York
Cornell Cooperative Extension

Cultural Practices for Disease Management
Curtis Petzoldt
Integrated Pest Management Program
New York State Agricultural Experiment Station; Geneva, New York

Identifying and Encouraging Beneficial Insects
Michael P. Hoffmann
NYS IPM Program and Department of Entomology
Cornell University

Insect Management: Managing Beneficial Habitats, Using Organic Insecticides
Ruth Hazzard
Dept. of Entomology
University of Massachusetts Extension

Pest Management on Applefield Farm
Steve Mong
Applefield Farm
Stow, Massachusetts

Pest Management from a Farmer's Perspective
David Marchant
River Berry Farm
Fairfax, Vermont

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